Category: The Falcon and The Winter Soldier

Apr
24

Press/Interview: Sebastian Stan on ‘Endings, Beginnings’ and “Massive Action” of ‘Falcon and The Winter Soldier’

Hollywood Reporter — The actor also dives into the debated ending of ‘Avengers: Endgame’ and what the future holds for Bucky Barnes: “These characters are getting so much more mileage for all of us to explore them.”

Sebastian Stan jumped at the chance to try his hand at improvising for the duration of Drake Doremus’ latest relationship drama, ‘Endings, Beginnings’. Starring opposite Shailene Woodley and Jamie Dornan, Stan plays an Angeleno named Frank, whose erratic behavior complicates a budding relationship between Daphne (Woodley) and his friend Jack (Dornan). Despite being intimidated by the exercise of improvisation, Stan knew it was important for him to see what he was capable of without the comfort and safety of a script.

“I’ve always felt protected by scripts, lines and scenes. I feel like I’m one of those people who’s opened up much more by scripts. I’m not as witty on my own,” Stan tells The Hollywood Reporter. “This was one of those different experiences, and I would certainly do it again. I’d be curious to see if I could ever use parts of [improvisation] in a bigger movie… So, maybe this was a really training experience for that.”

Until the coronavirus pandemic shut down the entirety of Hollywood, Stan was just a few weeks away from wrapping Marvel Studios’ ‘The Falcon and the Winter Soldier’ — the MCU’s first foray into scripted television for Disney+. Since many fans have wondered whether the show would maintain the look and feel of its theatrical counterparts, Stan is now shedding some light on how cinematic the streaming show is.

“It felt like both. In a lot of ways, it felt like a movie,” Stan recalls. “What I loved about it was that, tonally, it was very much in the same world that ‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ was, which was one of my favorite experiences that I’ve ever had, period. So, in a sense, it was grounded and very much in the world as we know it. But, it’s also really jam-packed with a lot of massive, massive action scenes mixed with deep focus on character. These characters are getting so much more mileage for all of us to explore them. We can put them in situations that we’ve never been able to put them in before because you now have six hours as opposed to two.”

Now a year removed from the release of ‘Avengers: Endgame’, the highest grossing film of all time, questions are still being asked about Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) and Bucky Barnes’ concluding moments. While many fans agree with Rogers’ choice to pass his iconic shield on to Sam Wilson, there’s also a contingent of fans who wanted to see Bucky take on the mantle of Captain America from his best friend. To Stan, Steve was giving Bucky the same gift he gave himself: a life.

“Steve is saying to Bucky, ‘You’re going to go and do that, too. I’m not going to put this thing on you. We’re both going to live our lives — the lives that were actually taken from us back in the ‘40s when we enlisted,’” Stan explains. “So, that’s where I felt they were at the end of the movie. I don’t think there’s a desire or any conflicted thoughts about taking on that mantle. Sam, to me, was always the clear man to take on that mantle for numerous reasons, which also comes with so much more baggage that’s going to be explored in the show. I guess you’ll have to tune into Disney+ to find out why. (Laughs.) At the end of Endgame, for either Steve or Bucky, it’s really not about the shield.”

In a recent conversation with THR, Stan elaborates on the process of improvising an entire movie, the latest with Disney+’s ‘The Falcon and the Winter Soldier’ and his interpretation of Steve and Bucky’s last moments in ‘Avengers: Endgame’.

How’s everything with you in New York?

It’s alright considering what people are going through out there. I’m pretty lucky. I haven’t been home in a long time so it’s been good to be home. You always feel weird when somebody says you can’t do something; It’s difficult to grasp that quickly. But, in truth, if I wasn’t working and I had time at home, I would probably be doing what I’m doing now. I’m writing, watching a lot of movies and just taking advantage of this time to chill out and get back to being present, something that is more and more difficult in our lives. I’m finding that my motivation is all over the place. Once I get to about 3 o’clock, I’m done for the day because it’s hard for me to get my focus back. So, I try to do all the important bits in the morning. Once in a while, I’ll go out for a run in the very early morning because I know nobody is around here in New York, and I was able to grab a couple of really cool stills of Times Square empty. It’s just weird, but anything to make a day go by. (Laughs.) This is where we’re at.

So, as I said to Jamie, I felt like I was invading the characters’ privacy while watching ‘Endings, Beginnings. Did you feel that level of intimacy as a performer?

Yeah, man, it was extremely intimate right from the beginning. I was familiar with Drake’s work so I kinda had an idea going into it, but I didn’t really know what the process was going to be like. It really just started with this one-on-one meeting that Drake and I had really early on; we ended up talking for three hours about everything, basically. I don’t think either of us are small-talk guys anymore, so that felt very natural. I loved how honest he was about life experience, relationships and the curiosity of it all. So, we really hit it off. When I met him, I think I was trying to sway him to think of me as Jack, Jamie’s character. Personally, I felt a little closer to that character, but when we made the movie, Drake made me believe I was wrong. (Laughs.) We had an outline of what the movie was trying for, but the specificity of the performances, the relationship dynamics and the chemistry really made it feel like we were discovering it in the present moment on the day. There wasn’t a lot of rehearsal. Shailene came in late in the movie, and we probably had about two weeks where we were kind of rehearsing and just getting to know each other a little bit. The rest was a day-to-day, on-set trial and error in order to see what would light people up.

Since you had just come off a string of massive Marvel movies, was it nice to get back to basics with a film like this, so to speak?

Well, yeah, it’s just different. Particularly in the last two years for me, I’ve been so much more aware of directors like never before. I’ve desperately wanted to work with very specific directors — Drake being one of them. Then, when you go on that set with a specific director you’ve wanted to work with, they have a very specific vision, and I just immediately know that I’m going into somebody’s very specific vision. On the bigger movies, for example, I had a relationship with the Russos over three movies, and I knew the way they were working. Every time, I sort of felt like we were picking it back up again, but just in terms of format, structure and overall scope, I knew they were making a very different movie each time. On these little movies, sometimes, the director can take these very specific points of views, and you’re just in the hands of that. That’s what makes the experience different because it’s that director’s vision, and it’s very oriented to that particular person. That’s how I felt with Drake, and that’s how I imagine other specific directors are. I recently worked with Antonio Campos [on The Devil All the Time], who’s another director whose movies I love, and I’ve always wanted to work with him. Again, he has a very specific approach, vision and how he wants the thing to look and feel. You kind of just surrender to that.

When your character, Frank, first meets Shailene’s character, Daphne, at the New Year’s Eve party, they jokingly put distance between one another. Since many of us are now watching entertainment through our present-day lens, have you realized how ahead of the curve you were in this case?

(Laughs.) I didn’t even think about that; you’re right. It’s interesting to think because we don’t know, really, what the ramifications of this social distancing will be. We may still feel the effects of it well into the next couple years. It’s going to be a while before we get life back to “normal,” but will it ever really go back to normal? That’s the stuff that remains to be seen. I can definitely see a world where people are much more conscious about personal space, perhaps. I don’t know. Shailene and I were talking in another interview the other day, and I was like, “Listen, I know you’re a hugger — and so am I — but do you think people are going to want to be hugged by us after this?” I don’t know.

At least we can now opt not to shake hands without offending anyone.

Well, apparently, no one liked that. I was not aware that that was not a fun thing to do. Yeah, that might be gone at this point.

I got a kick out of Frank’s The Pianist reference. Did you name a different movie for each improvised take?

(Laughs.) No, that was the only time I referenced a movie. Every time it was different. One of the things that I learned with Drake really early on was to never try and do something that worked, again. That reference worked; I didn’t know he was gonna use it. Doing it again — even remotely getting close to it — goes against his way of working. You’re just recreating a moment, and he wants everything to be very fresh and in the moment. I have a friend who always picks on me for watching heavy, intense, dramatic movies by myself at home on the weekends. He just makes fun of me all the time. So, the reference came from that. I love all movies, but I just love watching the heavier dramatic movies. (Laughs.) So, it came from remembering that in the moment and just saying it. It was odd enough, but it made it.

I asked Jamie this question, but I’d like to get your take as well. How do you ensure that you’re improvising as the character and not as Sebastian?

That’s the problem. I don’t know. Even though we’re improvising as honestly as possible, we’re still kind of doing it with a direction from the outline. I think that is what gives it an element that’s still affected rather than me just going up there and saying how I feel. And then, in the editing room, which is what makes Drake brilliant at this, he finds the moments; the way he cuts is just fascinating to me. I remember saying to him, “Drake, no take is the same. I don’t know how you’re going to cut this. It’s impossible.” And yet, he made it work. He found the conversation, and he found the moments. He’s got a very specific way of cutting that I love which is the reactions and so on. He really filtered those performances in the editing room as well. There was a lot of back-and-forth dialogue between me and Shailene that never made it, but again, it’s about him picking what he feels is right for who each character is.

Did you have any history with improvisation before this experience?

No, not at all.

Were you intimidated by it?

I definitely was. Absolutely, I was. I didn’t have an audition for the movie, but I had that three-hour session with Drake where we talked about different things and topics. I think he was just curious to see how honest our conversation could go, and I just wasn’t afraid of that. It was very scary at the beginning. It’s that question you asked, where you go, “Well, this isn’t really who I am. I don’t do these things that this character does.” I’ve always felt protected by scripts, lines and scenes. I feel like I’m one of those people who’s opened up much more by scripts. I’m not as witty on my own. This was one of those different experiences, and I would certainly do it again. I’d be curious to see if I could ever use parts of it in a bigger movie. Believe it or not, on those bigger projects, you do use improv. You do the scenes a couple times. You get it as it’s written on paper, and then you say, “Let’s just do this one more time and try it out this way. Let’s just see what happens and then we have it.” Sometimes, that ends up in the movie because it’s weirdly a sort of wildcard. So, maybe this was a really training experience for that.

Shifting gears to some obligatory Marvel questions… Did you shoot ‘The Falcon and the Winter Soldier’ like a TV show or movie?

It felt like both. In a lot of ways, it felt like a movie. Again, we’re not finished; we still have some stuff to do. What I loved about it was that, tonally, it was very much in the same world that ‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ was, which was one of my favorite experiences that I’ve ever had, period. So, in a sense, it was grounded and very much in the world as we know it. But, it’s also really jam-packed with a lot of massive, massive action scenes mixed with deep focus on character. That’s what’s really exciting about this. We’re getting to keep it in the world of the movies, so it’s recognizable that way, but at the same time, these characters are getting so much more mileage for all of us to explore them. We can put them in situations that we’ve never been able to put them in before because you now have six hours as opposed to two. It’s always a discovery.

Prior to the shutdown, is it true that you were only a week away from wrapping?

No, we were probably at least two or three, but don’t quote me on that.

At the end of ‘Avengers: Endgame’, between the dialogue and your performance, it seemed pretty cut and dried that Bucky knew about Steve’s plan to remain in the past with Peggy (Hayley Atwell). Were you surprised that some people didn’t entirely pick up on that?

I don’t know if I was surprised. The Internet completely misconstrued something else and made it entirely into something that it wasn’t, but later, I sort of became aware that people really felt like we needed to have more between the two of them or something. But, it hadn’t occurred to me because at the same time, that scene was saying so much with subtext. That being said, how do you put it all together in a three-hour movie? To merge all those different stories together, you could’ve had another movie of everybody saying goodbye to each other. So, I love how much people care about those two characters and that they wanted more from them, but I just took it as “This is as much screen time as we’ve got left before the movie ends.” It was already such a long movie. And then, it’s just the knowledge that these guys have always known each other’s moves, so to speak. They knew each other so well that they could say, “Okay, I know what he’s going to do, what decisions he’s going to make and I support that.” Yeah, it’s just what it was. That’s what was on the page, and that’s what we shot.

Bucky hugged Steve and said he was gonna miss him. To me, it’s crystal clear that you played it as knowing Steve’s intent.

Oh, a thousand percent, yeah. I played it as goodbye. What I was playing was, “Okay, I know he’s going, and he’s not going to come back. I can’t talk about it, because if I do, then they’re going to try and stop him from doing what he wants to do. So, I’ve gotta support that.” That’s what I was playing in the scene. Suddenly, when he shows back up again, I’m playing it like, “Oh! Well, he didn’t tell me he was gonna do that. I knew he was gonna leave, and even though I knew what he was going to do with the shield, I didn’t know he was gonna pop up over there now and be older.” So, I was playing that. Look, I love a good scene with dialogue, but sometimes, I find it really interesting when there’s not a lot said. And funnily enough, it’s sort of been the trademark of Bucky. Then, you’re watching behavior, you’re watching the eyes and you’re wondering what they’re thinking. You’re more involved and tuned in. So, it’s always fun for me to try to do as much as I can without dialogue. It’s exciting as an actor because then I wonder what people are getting out of it. In that aspect, it’s fun.

Some people still lament the fact that Steve didn’t give Bucky the shield in order to take on the mantle of Captain America. Bucky may have been brainwashed, but Captain America is such a symbolic position that you can’t just write off fifty years of transgressions by The Winter Soldier. I also have a hard time imagining that Bucky would even want that role. Since you know Bucky best, what’s your impression of Steve’s choice?

The MCU — as I saw it from my humble perspective — is a bit different in that regard to the comics. Where we arrived with him at the end felt more like he was in a place with a desire for some sort of release: to start over, start life again in a way, find out who he is again on his own and leave all this behind. Yes, it all happened, but at some point, you gotta own your mistakes, what happened and try to start over. That’s where I felt like the character was at the end of ‘Avengers: Endgame’. It’s also what he wanted for Steve. Like anybody that ends up traumatized by a war experience, he was affected by it for the rest of his life. So, what felt like a desire there was for a restart — for him and for Steve in a way. It didn’t necessarily feel like the shield was gonna be that. Steve going back in time and saying, “I’m gonna take something for me now. I’ve been here for all these guys, and I’ve done the best I could. I’m just a man, and I’m going to go back and try to live my life.” I feel that is something that Bucky would want for his best friend, and at the same time, Steve is saying to Bucky, “You’re going to go and do that, too. I’m not going to put this thing on you. We’re both going to live our lives — the lives that were actually taken from us back in the ‘40s when we enlisted.” So, that’s where I felt they were at the end of the movie. I don’t think there’s a desire or any conflicted thoughts about taking on that mantle. Sam, to me, was always the clear man to take on that mantle for numerous reasons, which also comes with so much more baggage that’s going to be explored in the show. I guess you’ll have to tune into Disney+ to find out why. (Laughs.) At the end of Endgame, for either Steve or Bucky, it’s really not about the shield.

I really loved ‘Destroyer’, and I thought you were great in it. It continues to blow my mind that Karyn Kusama isn’t able to do whatever she wants. Granted, she just got Universal’s Dracula…

I already emailed her about that. I said, “You know I’m from Romania, right?” and she goes, “Yes, yes, it’s very early — and there’s a pandemic. Hopefully, we’ll see you in four years.” (Laughs.)

What comes to mind when you reflect on that experience and working with Karyn?

Thank you for mentioning that movie. I love that movie, I love her and I had such a great time on it. I would love to keep finding projects with her — projects that kind of push you in a different direction. Again, this goes back to your earlier questions about these smaller movies, and I was referencing the vision of a director, how important that is and sometimes surrendering to that. That’s what that movie was for me. Karyn saw this character and movie in a certain way, and it was my job to learn that world, the tone and fit into it. I loved her as a director because she was so specific with me from the get-go. She also really allowed me to discover it on my own. We talked about the tattoos, the look, his history… It was very collaborative before we started, and then, when we started, it was actually very specific. She was one of those directors that made me feel so safe and confident in my choices, simply by the way she communicated with me. I think that came from her absolute confidence in what she wanted and what she saw. I really wish more people had seen that movie. Maybe they have by now; I don’t know. And obviously — Nicole Kidman. It was one of those dreams to work opposite her. It was a good package.

***

‘Endings, Beginnings’ is now available on digital HD and VOD on May 1.

Mar
10

News: Disney Halts ‘The Falcon And The Winter Soldier’ Prague Shoot Over Coronavirus Concerns

Deadline – EXCLUSIVE: Another high-profile coronavirus casualty. After the government of Prague closed schools and placed other restrictions on event and travel, the Disney+ series ‘The Falcon and The Winter Soldier’ from Marvel has shut down production there because of concerns over the virus, whose global spread has the entire world on alert. The show stars Anthony Mackie and Sebastian Stan as the title characters, and is a spinoff from the Captain America and Avengers films.

The show has been shooting for months in Atlanta, but they began a short shoot in Prague last Friday that was to be completed in about a week. Today, the studio shut down the production and called everybody home to Atlanta. No word at the moment whether the show will return to Prague, but it seems unlikely.

This is the second time the series has been interrupted by real events: plans to shoot in Puerto Rico in January were squashed because of a 6.4 magnitude earthquake along its southern coast, reportedly the island’s biggest in a century.

‘The Falcon and The Winter Soldier’ premieres on Disney + in August.

Feb
02

Press/Video: ‘The Falcon and The Winter Soldier’ Superbowl TV Ad (feat. new footage)

During the Superbowl tonight a commercial for several Marvel Disney+ shows including new footage for ‘The Falcon and The Winter Solider’ aired. You can now view the new footage online.

Jan
20

Press/Video: Sebastian Stan Talks ‘The Falcon And The Winter Soldier’ & New Movie ‘The Last Full Measure’

ETCanada.com – Fans know that ‘Avengers: Endgame’ was never the end of the Marvel universe – especially with the announcement of the new Disney+ series ‘The Falcon and the Winter Soldier’ . While chatting with ET Canada, star Sebastian Stan shares how he and Anthony Mackie have been hard at work preparing for the show. Plus, he teases his new film, ‘The Last Full Measure’.

Sep
03

Video: ‘The Falcon and the Winter Soldier’ cast teases what Sharon’s been up to, other plot hints

EW.com — The cast of forthcoming Disney+ series The Falcon and the Winter Soldier are shielding plot details pretty fiercely — but when they sat down in EW and PEOPLE’s video studio backstage at Disney’s D23 Expo, they did tease a few hints.

Aug
26

First Poster for ‘The Falcon and the Winter Soldier’ Shows Off Bucky with Short Hair

CinemaBlend.com — The Falcon and the Winter Soldier will be one of the first Marvel shows available to stream on Disney+ and a new poster out of the D23 Expo already highlights a significant change for one of its characters. That’s right, Bucky Barnes is sporting a fresh, short new haircut. The floppy, shoulder-length hair he had in films like Captain America: Civil War and, more recently, Avengers: Endgame is gone.

Aug
26

Video: Sebastian Stan & Anthony Mackie Talk ‘The Falcon and the Winter Soldier ‘ at the 2019 D23 Expo

This past weekend Sebastian stopped by the 2019 D23 Expo to promote his upcoming show The Falcon and the Winter Soldier on Disney’s new streaming platform Disney+ which debuts this November.

You can check out all the press interviews in the below YouTube playlist along with high quality screen captures.

Aug
24

TV Guide: Everything We Know About The Falcon and the Winter Soldier on Disney+

TVGuide.com — Although Avengers: Endgame concluded what has now become known as the Infinity Saga earlier this year, the Marvel Cinematic Universe goes on. In addition to a number of films currently in the works as part of Phase Four, some of your favorite Avengers will also be venturing to the small screen for limited series on Disney+, Disney’s streaming service, which is set to launch Nov. 12.

The first series coming our way will be The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, which finds Anthony Mackie and Sebastian Stan reprising their fan-favorite roles as Sam Wilson and Bucky Barnes, respectively. As is the case with everything Marvel related, details surrounding the series are still pretty scarce, but here’s everything we know so far.

It’s coming in 2020. Although we would like to have it streaming directly into our eyeballs much, much sooner, The Falcon and the Winter Soldier won’t be available to stream until fall of 2020.

There will reportedly be six episodes. Each of Marvel’s new series will be limited in nature, but as we’ve learned recently, that word doesn’t really have any meaning in Hollywood anymore. Maybe if we’re good and ask really nicely Marvel will grant us more seasons?

Zemo is back. We knew there was a reason Daniel Bruhl’s Zemo lived at the end of Captain America: Civil War, and during Marvel’s panel at San Diego Comic-Con in July, Marvel Studios boss Kevin Feige revealed it’s because he’s returning to stir up trouble for Cap’s two best friends.

Sharon Carter is also back. Kevin Feige announced Emily VanCamp is also returning to play Peggy’s niece during the D23 Expo on Friday, Aug. 23.

John Walker will be played by Wyatt RussellIn the comics, John Walker is (currently) known as U.S. Agent, but before that, he also was known as Super-Patriot, who openly opposed Captain America — the OG Captain America, Steve Rogers. It’ll be interesting to see if that’s still the case, considering that the mantel has now been passed off to Sam.

It takes place after the events of Endgame. This is pretty obvious, especially when you consider the iconic shield that is part of the show’s logo design, but the series will pick up in the wake of Endgame. This means that Sam will likely be dealing with having to live up to Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) as Captain America.

It will be directed by Kari Skogland. Skogland, whose recent credits include The Handmaid’s TaleThe Loudest Voice, and The Punisher, is on board to direct the show.

Disney+ launches on Nov. 12. Find out what else is coming to the new streaming service.

Aug
23

Photos: 2019 D23 Expo

On August 23rd, Sebastian Stan and Anthony Mackie teamed up during the Disney+ Showcase at Disney’s D23 EXPO 2019 in Anaheim, California to discuss their upcoming series The Falcon and The Winter Soldier which will debut on their new platform next year.

The Falcon and The Winter Soldier will stream exclusively on Disney+, which launches November 12. 2019.

May
27

Sebastian Stan and Anthony Mackie are teaming up in ‘Falcon and The Winter Soldier’ on Disney+

This news originally broke back in early April. I’ve compiled all the information about the upcoming miniseries below.

    Post summary:

  • Sebastian Stan and Anthony Mackie will star in a Disney+ miniseries titled ‘Falcon and The Winter Soldier’
  • The show will begin filming in October in Atlanta, Georgia.
  • Daniel Bruhl and Emily Van Camp will reprise their MCU roles.
  • The series will premiere in 2020 with a reported 6 episodes.
  • Malcolm Spellman is set to serve as the writer and showrunner.
  • Disney+ will debut November 12, 2019 for $6.99 a month.

Marvel.com — Announced during The Walt Disney Company’s Investor Day, Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige shared Marvel Studios’ excitement to explore long-form stories in ways we’ve never done before.

Bucky Barnes and Sam Wilson have been enemies, and they’ve been friends. Get ready for more adventures from them in “Falcon and The Winter Soldier,” with Anthony Mackie and Sebastian Stan.

It is also worth noting how the individual shows Disney+ aims to create will affect future theatrical releases from the MCU. You can read more below..

Vulture.com — And most importantly for continuity fans, Feige did say that developments in Marvel shows will impact narrative developments in upcoming superhero theatrical releases. “A post-Endgame MCU will be extremely different and extremely focused on Disney+ tying into our future,” Feige told the crowd. In other words, you have to subscribe to Disney+ if you really want to know what’s going on in the MCU.

On May 20th Deadline announced who will be directing the upcoming The Falcon and the Winter Soldier miniseries.

In addition to who will be directing they’re also reported that Captain America: Civil War’s Daniel Bruhl and Emily Van Camp will also be joining Sebastian and Anthony for the series and will air in August 2020.

Kari Skogland has been set to direct the six-part Disney+ miniseries The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, with Avengers: Endgame‘s Anthony Mackie and Sebastian Stan starring. Sources said Captain America: Civil War‘s Daniel Bruhl and Emily Van Camp are also in talks to join. The miniseries will air in August 2020.

I’d heard that Mackie’s accepting the shield from Captain America at the end of Avengers: Endgame will figure into the miniseries, but the studio had no comment on where it goes.

Bruhl played Zemo in Captain America: Civil War, the mastermind who drove a wedge between Captain America and Iron Man that factored into the Avengers films, and the murderer of Black Panther’s father. Malcolm Spellman (Empire) has been writing.

ComicBook.com reports Sebastian revealed his expectations for the series at a recent comic convention. You can read what he had to say below:

“I think it’s time for Bucky to go out there and have an identity outside of the circumstances that we’ve met him through,” Stan said. “So, I don’t know, he might do all kinds of things. He might even go on a date. I don’t know. Scary world out there, you know? Apps, things like that. I don’t know what he’s gonna do. I can’t see him on an iPhone…I think it’s gonna be a lot of dealing with Anthony’s character and Anthony himself which is always another character.”

Sebastian also revealed the series would begin filming in October, though he did not give an exact date. The series will reportedly film in Atlanta, Georgia.

The Winter Soldier actor also praised his co-star, Anthony Mackie, saying:

“I have a blast working with Anthony. It’s very funny half the time. It’s just gonna be a lot of that move your seat up thing, I’m gonna tell him that if we’re gonna be in the car, I’m gonna be in the passenger’s seat and he’s gonna be in the back, or I should be in the driver’s seat.”

For those who aren’t familiar with Disney+ here is some key information about the upcoming streaming service:

Launching on November 12, 2019, at $6.99 a month, Disney+ will be the ultimate streaming destination for movies and shows from Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars, and National Geographic. From The Walt Disney Company’s Direct-to-Consumer and International segment, Disney+ will offer ad-free programming with a variety of original feature-length films, documentaries, live action and animated series and short-form content, along with unprecedented access to Disney’s incredible library of film and television entertainment. The service will also be the exclusive streaming home for films released by The Walt Disney Studios in 2019 and beyond, including “Captain Marvel,” “Avengers: Endgame,” “Toy Story 4,” “The Lion King,” “Aladdin,” and “Star Wars Episode IX.”