Category: Press

Jun
21

Press/Video:“We Were Able to Completely Exist and Believe That We Were These People”: ‘THR Presents’ Q&A With ‘Pam & Tommy’ Stars Lily James, Sebastian Stan (w/ Screen Captures)

Hollywood Reporter – The actors talk about their preparation to play Pamela Anderson and Tommy Lee in the Hulu series.

Pam & Tommy stars Lily James and Sebastian Stan were just as shocked by their transformations into Pamela Anderson and Tommy Lee, respectively, as the rest of the world was.

“There was a conversation about me being involved really early on, and I was incredibly surprised — dumbfounded — and I suppose that spiked my curiosity that they thought of me for the part,” James told THR Presents, powered by Vision Media. “It was a complete mind-blowing shock for everyone. The first makeup test I had … we just sort of threw some stuff on to get a sense, and at the end, I was having a full panic attack and thinking, ‘I can’t do this, I can’t do this, I’m going to let everyone down, it’s the biggest embarrassment.’ Then the journey they took with prosthetic … I had a forehead piece, teeth and eyes. And when we needed it, I wore the entire chest piece, but like, it was mind-blowing what they achieved. And the same when I looked at Sebastian, we were able to completely exist and believe that we were these people and in turn do our best shot at really trying to and convincingly inhabit them and do them justice. And it was all linked. We couldn’t do one without the other. It was really quite extraordinary.”

James said she watched Anderson’s major interviews from the ’90s “to get her mannerisms — she talks like a million miles per hour and only stops to breathe.”

“I just tried to make it feel as personal and as spontaneous as I could, but also, having really studied and learned how she talks and moves, I trained so hard, lost tons of weight, — put it all back on — I worked with an amazing acting coach, I found her pitch on the piano,” explained James. “I really just wanted to do her justice and to try as much as I could to sort of emulate so that you feel that you catch an essence of who that person is as best as you possibly can.”

During the time of Pam & Tommy‘s release, there was a video circulating on social media that showed James doing 600 sit-ups a day to prepare for the role. However, James said that’s not quite accurate, as she did 600 sit-ups a day for another film she did called Fast Girls (2012) and not for the Hulu series.

For Stan, mimicking Tommy Lee’s drumming was the most daunting task in his preparation. “I’d never played drums at all. And I remember asking [director] Craig [Gillespie], ‘Are you gonna want to use a double or something?’ He was like, ‘uh, no.’ And so I started the drums on the weekends in Canada, trying to take weekend lessons. And then I remember, after a month, I sent him a video of me doing it and he was like, ‘yeah, it’s great. I just have to speed it up by about 100 frames, but should be OK,’” added Stan, laughing. “It was a combination of literally waking up in the morning, making coffee and running on an empty stomach and fasting for half the day, trying to get 20,000 steps to lose weight. And while I’m running, basically, I’m playing audio of every interview I’ve accumulated off of YouTube or the internet of him going all the way back to the ’80s to now, anything I could find to hear him all all over, then I’d get home, I’d watch videos.”

Stan said that he did karaoke one night and woke up to a raspy voice, which he thought perfectly encapsulated the voice he needed for Tommy Lee. “It sounds like I smoke 10,000 cigarettes. And then that manifested into screaming into a pillow to keep the raspiness and then I know Lily was doing it too. We would do four scenes and I’d be like, ‘You want the pillow?!’”

Pam & Tommy creator Robert Siegel was tasked with the challenge of making a show about two people who wanted no part in it.

“You read as much as you can,” said Siegel. “In this case, we had a lot more information about Tommy. We have, of course, Tommy’s autobiography, Tommyland, which provides a wealth of information. And then there’s court transcripts, which were really, really useful for the episode six deposition episode. And then once you’ve accumulated as much information as is out there, you just try to really do right by these people. We were always really diligent about trying to be on their side. Pam is definitively the hero of the story. We always wanted to be very clear that that this was a crime committed against them. You don’t know if they’re going to see the show, but you want to approach it as if they’re going to see the show.”

“Pam, in particular, but both of them were sort of our number one audience,” agreed D.V. DeVincentis, writer of three episodes of the show as well as executive producer. “But Pam, in particular, this was something she suffered the most from and really sort of survived in this completely self sufficient and kind of brilliant way in the way that she does. And we really wanted to show if we’re working with [telling] her whole life story, we want to at least show the way we see her and the way we still see her.”

In terms of taking creative liberty, Siegel said he stayed pretty true to the Rolling Stone article written by Amanda Chicago Lewis, which told the story of how the sex tape was stolen by a man named Rand Gauthier, played by Seth Rogen in the show. “We were pretty faithful to the article,” said Siegel. “There’s not much in the show that’s not in the article. I’m kind of proud. You’re always prepared for the possibility of making things up. A couple of things we definitely did make up, but for the most part, it’s what’s in the article.”

Added DeVincentis: “We’re not entirely certain that the the narrative that Rand Gauthier laid out in the article is necessarily true, but it’s a hell of a story.”

Note: The complete video interview is at the Hollywood Reporter link above. I’ve added screen captures to the gallery.

Jun
20

Press/Video: Sebastian Stan Reveals How He Maintained Tommy Lee’s Amped Energy Levels in ‘Pam & Tommy’ (w/ Screen Captures)

Awards Daily – Sebastian Stan Reveals How He Maintained Tommy Lee’s Amped Energy Levels in ‘Pam & Tommy’

Awards Daily talks to Sebastian Stan of Pam & Tommy about that tub scene with Lily James and how he maintained Tommy’s totally-amped energy in the Hulu limited series.

One of the more underrated aspects of Sebastian Stan’s performance as Tommy Lee in Hulu’s Pam & Tommy is the level of energy he brings to any room. Not only is there the physical presence, but Tommy always seems to be yelling, demanding to be heard.

“It almost feels like he’s never not playing the drums,” says Stan. “If you look at him in concert, which is one of the reasons why he’s so great at playing the drums, he’s always moving. I actually used an ear piece for the first time in my life and I actually would have a tiny ear piece in one of my ears throughout the scenes and I would just play music, often Motley Crüe music. And it would help me be at that level of energy.”

I had a great conversation with Stan about channeling that energy, the different iterations of Tommy’s “big reveal” to Pam (Lily James), and whether he’d ever revisit this real-life character in the future. Watch the interview below!

Jun
18

Press: ‘Pam & Tommy,’ ‘Only Murders in the Building’ and ‘Russian Doll’ Editors Explain How They Cut Together Their Most Challenging Scenes

Hollywood Reporter – These series blend comedy and drama, which meant their editors had to find the right tonal balance.

Tatiana Riegel’s long collaboration with director Craig Gillespie includes I, Tonya — the dark comedy about the Tonya Harding 1990s figure skating scandal for which the editor earned an Oscar nomination — and their latest, Pam & Tommy, for which she again had to walk a fine line between humor and seriousness.

“For Craig to be attached to it, I knew there was going to be a certain emotional level to it,” she says of the Hulu limited series, which revolves around the marriage of model-actress Pamela Anderson and Mötley Crüe drummer Tommy Lee and their notorious sex tape. “And it would be intriguing in addition to his comic sense, [showcasing] his ability to sort of walk back and forth between those two places in a lovely way.”

Riegel, whose work with Gillespie also spans Lars and the Real Girl (2007) and Disney’s Cruella (2021), cut the first three episodes of Pam & Tommy, which vary greatly. The first follows Seth Rogen as Rand Gauthier, the man who steals valuables (and, inadvertently, the sex tape) from the couple after Lee (Sebastian Stan) stiffs him on a construction job. The second goes back in time, showing viewers how Pam (Lily James) and Tommy met, fell in love and were married. The third in the eight-episode arc picks up the narrative just after Rand had stolen the tape, and the story proceeds from there.

“Then you get into this much more emotional storyline of what’s happening to Pam — both of them — but I feel, or at least how I interpreted it, was sort of more the Pam story,” Riegel says. “A lot of it is defined by the script, and that’s the jumping-off point in terms of the broader themes of fame, how women are treated versus men and a love story that is very unusual. Those are the things that I really liked about the scripts for the first three episodes that I read, early on, and that I thought were just going to be really fun and challenging to cut.”

Finding each character’s tone was critical. She says of the first episode, “Seth Rogen is obviously known for this wonderful, great, broad, hysterical comedy, and this was a very different role for him. It was much quieter and stiller. [In the editing, I had to] find that and make sure that we didn’t drift into other things.”

She also had to navigate the arc of Stan’s Lee as he is seen in the first episode by Rand. “To make Tommy Lee as unappealing as he actually is in that first episode [took] work, because Sebastian’s fantastic and charming,” says Riegel, who also worked with Stan on I, Tonya (he played Harding’s then-husband, Jeff Gillooly). “You have to find all of those moments without making him too horrible because you want the audience to empathize with him and be into his story as well. But he’s doing dreadful things in the first episode and is really a jerk. Finding that line is just always interesting.”

In contrast, a very different side of Lee is seen in episode two, during which newlyweds Pam and Tommy are home one night watching TV and Pam introduces her husband to The King and I. She sings “Getting to Know You” from the classic musical as the pair playfully giggle and dance around the bedroom.

“That particular scene was a real pivotal turning point, emotionally, in the story,” Riegel says. “This is a really unusual scene, to have a character like Tommy Lee watching this musical. She’s so into it. I find it to be this really sweet, vulnerable scene that they both are participating in. And I feel like that really cracks the door open for the rest of the season.”

It was also a tough scene to cut, she adds. “They’re moving all over this room, and musically, you’re having to follow along with the specific song and create the fun, the movement, the emotion, the relationship, the vulnerability, all of those things happening all at once.”

Jun
18

Press: Why ‘Pam and Tommy’ Used Sebastian Stan’s Vocals Instead of Tommy Lee’s for Motley Crue Covers

Variety – Why ‘Pam and Tommy’ Used Sebastian Stan’s Vocals Instead of Tommy Lee’s for Motley Crue Covers

In the finale of Hulu’s “Pam & Tommy,” based on the vastly different experiences of Pamela Anderson Lee and Tommy Lee during their sex tape scandal, Lee’s group Mötley Crüe performs a promotional gig in a Tower Records parking lot, pinned to their “Generation Swine” album. The song they perform is “Crüe-by-numbers,” even if you can’t quite place it. A Shazam tap reveals the song is actually “She Says Yeah Yeah,” and the singers are Sebastian Stan (who plays Lee), Sam Meader and Zack Gold, not Mötley Crüe.

In fact, there aren’t any Mötley Crüe songs in the series, partly due to financial constraints, according to Amanda Krieg Thomas, the show’s music supervisor. Mainly, however, she notes that it never felt like there was a need for one — with the exception of the one scene.

“The team wanted to wait until production was done before going down any Mötley Crüe roads,” says Krieg Thomas. “The financial component pointed us to the idea of, ‘What if we did something original in the style of the music they were making in that era?’”

Stan’s drum coach, Isaac Carpenter wrote, recorded and produced “She Says Yeah Yeah,” as well as played all the instruments on the song, barring the shredding lead guitar. Says Krieg Thomas, “[Carpenter] said, ‘I know this era. I know that music. I can nail it.’ And he did.”

Musician and producer Devin Bronson (Avril Lavigne, Krewella) recorded the lead guitar parts, as well as played hand double for the close shots. Chris Mann, who plays Mötley Crüe guitarist Mick Mars, learned the instrument just for the medium and wide shots.

Krieg Thomas reached out to Adam Anders, executive music producer for “Glee” to see if he knew someone who sounded like the band’s Vince Neil. Anders then pointed her to Scottish-born vocalist Storm Gardner, the Crüe singer’s vocal doppelgänger. “We also had Sofia Toufa who toured with Mötley Crüe, helping them with stage movement and choreography,” says Krieg Thomas. “She coached the guys on how the band performs, what Vince would do, what Nikki Sixx would do, how he holds his bass and how he looks when he’s doing it. It was cool to watch her. It added that level of authenticity to the performance.”

Krieg Thomas was given free reign on the needle drops of Craig Gillespie’s show. There were no restrictions on genre or period — or how many songs Krieg Thomas sent over.

“When I read the script, it felt very stylized,” she says. “There were a few scripted songs, but not tons of them. Some of them were ’90s songs, like La Bouche’s ‘Be My Lover,’ and some of them were older, like Dolly Parton’s ‘I Will Always Love You.’ I pulled 20 songs for [Gillespie] and said, ‘This is what eclectic means to me.’ He said, ‘This is great. Send me more.’ I sent 400 songs in the first week. Those hundreds of songs went in the bank for the editors. We started seeing the cuts, and I did not anticipate 20 songs in each episode. It’s such a specific way to use songs to tell a story.

There were some selections pinned to Pam, that Krieg Thomas was insistent on including. Among these are Captain & Tennille’s “Feel Like a Man,” used when she is descending into a hotel lobby full of “schlumpy” men, and Roxy Music’s “More Than This,” which plays during Pam’s first Playboy photoshoot. The idea was to subvert the type of music the viewer might associate with her.

These are moments where it’s important to showcase Pam and who she is, as well as who she has to put on display for the world,” says Krieg Thomas. “It’s not necessarily always from her perspective, but to communicate with the world, and how we, the audience, are supposed to feel about her and be with her in these moments, using music.”

Jun
15

Press: ‘Pam and Tommy’ to be unleashed on DVD this August via Lionsgate

Icon vs. Icon – ‘Pam and Tommy’ to be unleashed on DVD this August via Lionsgate.

The scandalous drama that set the Internet down a new path, “Pam & Tommy” arrives August 9 on DVD from Lionsgate.

The daring series created by Robert Siegel (The Wrestler, Big Fan) features Lily James (Cinderella, Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again), Sebastian Stan (Captain American: The Winter Solider, The Covenant), Seth Rogen (This Is the End, Superbad), Nick Offerman (“The Great North,” “Parks and Recreation”), and Taylor Schilling (The Lucky One, “Orange Is the New Black”). It will be available for the retail price of $19.98.

Set in THE WILD WEST early days of the Internet, “Pam & Tommy” is based on the incredible true story of the Pamela Anderson (Lily James) and Tommy Lee (Sebastian Stan) sex tape. Stolen from the couple’s home by a disgruntled contractor (Seth Rogen), the video went from underground bootleg-VHS curiosity to full-blown cultural obsession when it hit the Web in 1997. A love story, crime caper, and cautionary tale rolled into one, the eight-part original limited series explores the intersection of privacy, technology, and celebrity, tracing the origins of our current reality-TV era to a stolen tape seen by millions but meant to have an audience of just two.

Jun
15

Press: Lily James and Sebastian Stan find a real relationship at the heart of ‘Pam & Tommy’

LA Times – Lily James and Sebastian Stan find a real relationship at the heart of ‘Pam & Tommy’

Lily James knew of Pamela Anderson only as “the icon from ‘Baywatch’ and Playboy.” Sebastian Stan knew something of Mötley Crüe drummer Tommy Lee‘s reputation for debauchery. But when James and Stan got working on the limited series “Pam & Tommy,” which turns on the infamous sex tape stolen from the couple, the two actors found themselves struck by … innocence.

“There was a certain innocence to them that was in the script,” Stan says, “a lot of it in that initial, comet-like meeting that happened between them that led to three, four days in Mexico and, suddenly, a wedding. There was this instant pull, and it lasted for them. We were both conscious of trying to find that authentic kind of primal attraction, being protective of that and conveying that in the best way we possibly could.”

That high-speed collision of Anderson and Lee is depicted in the second episode. As presented by showrunner and writer Robert Siegel, director Craig Gillespie and the whole creative team, (especially cinematographer Paula Huidobro of “CODA,” editor Tatiana S. Riegel, who worked with Gillespie on “I, Tonya,” and the all-in hair-and-makeup department led by Barry Lee Moe, David Williams and Jason Collins), it’s a wild ride of two people falling head over heels in love — with a not-inconsiderable boost from mind-altering substances. The series doesn’t shy from portraying the couple’s explosive sexuality. It has loads of fun doing so. But as the poet sang, “Only true love can leave beauty innocent.”

Stan says, “We would meet at Craig’s house and he’d be like, ‘We’re gonna do this and all these push-ins, and these are gonna be the songs …’ When I watch that episode, I almost feel like I’m high.”

“High on love, high on drugs, high on everything,” agrees James from a separate Zoom screen. “It felt like them against the world, which felt so intoxicating to watch, and I think even more upsetting to see the world banging down their door.”

The actors’ transformations into the famous couple went viral before the show ever aired, but the stars solemnly attest to their determination to honor Anderson and Lee — and especially their relationship — despite the outsize personalities in the series and its crazy events. Seriously, four days knowing each other, then a beach wedding.

James laughs: “There’s no sense in falling in love!”

The Brit best known for “Downton Abbey” and “Cinderella” clearly enjoys the absurd. When the notion of her in the role came up, she thought, “‘Whoa, me? Pamela Anderson? That’s completely insane.’ I was just shocked I would be in anyone’s mind when it came to casting, and I was hungry for that.”

When she started researching, she was overwhelmed by the abundance of material. But when she found early Anderson interviews, “It would be like gold dust. Although she’d already ridden to huge fame, it’s that word Sebastian used: ‘innocence.’ The newness of her career, of ambition, of a relationship, of love — love feels so important for her energy. I began to see real anchors of behavior, mannerisms and physicality.

“We were working through the script in the garden. Craig was like, ‘Let’s just get it on its feet.’ We went out to his driveway and acted out the scene with the car outside the club — we were looking like Lily and Sebastian, so it was kind of weird without the whole —” she waves her hands to indicate makeup and costumes — “but there was something so playful … ‘This is cool, this is gonna come alive.’ ”

She looks down, smiling at the memory.

Stan says the scene in which the two actors felt most connected involved a bedroom fight — James cheers in assent as he invokes their nickname for it, “ ‘The John Cassavetes Scene’ in Episode 5.”

She interjects, “This is what I was going to say!”

“We were like, ‘It’s good in a oner!’ We had this wide shot,” he says, still enthused. “ ‘You could just keep it as a oner!’ ” he says of wanting a long, uninterrupted shot.

James shares his enthusiasm. “We were texting the showrunner this shot of the monitor: ‘Do this whole fight in this one wide shot!’ It was so physical,” she says. “It went from 1 to 100, like fights do.”

But in all the excitement, James emphasizes they were “really trying to explore that personal relationship to understand how deeply painful and unforgivable it was to rob that [tape] from them. To steal something so private.”

Stan echoes what a violation it was for a thief to expose their most intimate moments to the world.

“People just assumed they did [it on purpose]: Everybody has a sex tape, blah blah blah. But that was never the intention. Buried underneath all that, it’s two human beings who wanted to have a family. I feel like no one really thought of that,” he says.

“We just wanted to get to the human beings,” he adds. “We make a lot of projections on people — they were loud in certain ways, they were on top — but deep down, they just wanted to have a family and have some normalcy. That’s all they were trying to do.”

Jun
15

Press: How Sebastian Stan Traded Marvel Mania for a Hard-Rock Life in ‘Pam & Tommy’

The Wrap – The actor has received some of the best reviews of his career for portraying Motley Crüe’s Tommy Lee in the Hulu miniseries.

This story about Sebastian Stan first appeared in The Limited Series/Movies issue of TheWrap’s awards magazine.

Even in the carefully tended superhero universe where Sebastian Stan resided for quite some time as Bucky Barnes/Winter Soldier in various Marvel Cinematic Universe projects, the actor still got to play a distinctly dark duality. It’s a characteristic that has marked many of Stan’s best-known roles, such as figure-skating schemer Jeff Gillooly in “I, Tonya” and his recent turn as a human butcher in the thriller “Fresh”. But the prospect of playing Motley Crüe drummer Tommy Lee was a whole different jam.

The Hulu miniseries “Pam & Tommy” doesn’t focus on Lee’s bad-boy image, but rather the litigation surrounding the infamous sex tape that he and wife Pamela Anderson (Lily James) made — and that ended up being a bellwether for the boon of the amateur video market. The series doesn’t shy away from showing you his goes-to-11 bluster, but it also makes room for the guy who held Anderson’s hand in the hospital during some crushing personal news and could cook up a mean, full-course Greek meal just for fun.

“I was terrified, but the themes felt very resonant and timely, and anything (where I feel) a hesitancy or fear means there’s really something to unpack,” said the Romanian-born actor, who moved to the States in the ‘90s when he was an adolescent (and the heyday of hair-metal mania was over).

“Actually, in 2006, there were auditions for (the Motley Crüe biopic) ‘The Dirt,’ and I had actually gotten an audition to play Vince Neil. That film didn’t end up getting made then, but later did elsewhere (at Netflix), but by then I was too old for it.” Eventually, “I, Tonya” director Craig Gillespie approached Stan about “Pam & Tommy.“ He said, ‘I think you’d be great for this,’ though I was never quite sure why he thought that.”

Stan’s wild-eyed yet empathetic portrayal of the drummer with bravado to spare has won him praise from critics. The physical transformation into Lee took up to three hours every day to ensure that the jet-black hair, multiple ear-and-nipple piercings and tattoos were just right. There was even the application of a prosthetic puppet penis (voiced by Jason Mantzoukas) to whom Lee waxes romantic about his love for Anderson. This came right out of the eyebrow-raising biography “Tommyland” by Anthony Bozza that Stan used as a guidepost. (Lee also gave the miniseries his blessing.)

“Talking to (the hair and makeup team and costume designers) is just as important as the director,” Stan said. “I like to hear what they’re thinking and their take on the scene. In this instance, they were essential, because I don’t have tattoos and I don’t wear thongs,” he added, laughing. “But that time in the chair was very helpful. I used to listen to audio of Tommy to prepare, and it was just a great time on my own.”

The actor also had to learn to wail on a drum set like Lee notoriously did. He took lessons and is still trying to keep up with it post-shoot. “Tommy said it was a great outlet for him,” Stan said. “And I’ve always looked at acting as a way to learn new things, and you’re not always given that option. It’s the same with learning stunts and doing physical training. It’s just a really exciting thing.”

Jun
14

Press: Sebastian Stan Transformed Himself Like Never Before For ‘Pam & Tommy’

The Playlist – Sebastian Stan Transformed Himself Like Never Before For ‘Pam & Tommy’

Sebastian Stan will tell you that in order to play the Winter Soldier he spent years trying to put on “weight” to match the physique of Chris Hemsworth‘s of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. He’ll also tell you, in his own opinion, he never truly pulled it off. He went in a significantly different direction to play legendary drummer Tommy Lee in “Pam & Tommy.” For that series, Stan spent months learning how to play the drums and used intermittent fasting and exercise to try and duplicate Lee’s skinny and lanky frame. And yes, that physical transformation was just as difficult as trying to gain all that muscle for previous projects.

“It was tough because it required such drastic changes and it was learning new things,” Stan says. “But then once we got there, once I got to April and we had that camera test, it was delayed gratification. Finally, on that day of the camera test, all the work that I’d done and all the ideas I had had about how it was going to look and what was going to happen and the physical stuff, it all clicked and made me feel like it was part of helping me to get the courage to go there. And a lot of that had to do with the tattoos and the physical was a big part of it. But once we were in costume, once we had the hair and makeup and everything else, then it was, O.K. This is more real now. Up until that point, it was 100% anxiety every day.”

The Hulu limited series also saw his co-star Lily James become unrecognizable as Lee’s one-time wife (and, arguably, love of his life), Pamela Anderson. Over the course of our interview, Stan discusses reuniting with his “I, Tonya” director Craig Gillespie, the infamous and outrageous scenes in the program’s second episode, how he researched Lee’s life story, and much, much more.

_____ Continue reading

Jun
13

Press/Video: Sebastian Stan (‘Pam and Tommy’) reveals trick to staying ‘at a level 10, no matter what’ while playing rock icon Tommy Lee (w/ Screen Captures)

Gold Derby — Sebastian Stan (‘Pam and Tommy’) reveals trick to staying ‘at a level 10, no matter what’ while playing rock icon Tommy Lee

“I don’t play the drums, I don’t play any instrument,” confesses Sebastian Stan during our recent chat about his role as Mötley Crüe drummer Tommy Lee in the Hulu limited series “Pam and Tommy.” “I started taking drum lessons in January, about two-and-a-half months before we started. Everything about it was terrifying. It felt like big shoes to fill on every level. Personality-wise, certainly reputation-wise. Whether it was going to be believable. The idea of just going there was sort of terrifying.” Watch our exclusive video interview above.

Based on the 2014 Rolling Stone article “Pam and Tommy: The Untold Story of the World’s Most Infamous Sex Tape” by Amanda Chicago Lewis, the Hulu series follows the turbulent marriage of actress Pamela Anderson (played by Lily James) and Lee after their honeymoon sex tape is stolen and eventually launched on the internet for millions to see.

“The sex tape is the easiest thing to point the finger to, but then as you peel it apart you realize there’s all these other layers to it and there’s something extremely timely to it,” Stan says. “This celebrity obsession really started kicking up to a different level in the 90s. That has really percolated until today, including the loss of privacy and how we’re all affected by the internet and the parts that we play in it, anonymously. And the parts that the media plays, as well, shaping narratives that are not true.”

The actor says keeping up with Lee’s energy took a few tricks of his own. “He was always at a level 10, no matter what,” Stan explains. “That’s how he was written in the script and, if you look at the interviews, it almost feels like he’s always listening to a piece of music. Or he’s constantly almost at the drums even when he’s not playing. I tried [an] earpiece device that I had throughout the scenes and I would always have music playing in my head. There were some things you learn to rely on to get you there, but it is tough. It’s not you. You’re handed a life and you’re told, ‘Go fit into that somehow,’ and you don’t always know if you will or not.”

Note: The complete video interview is at the GoldDerby link above. I’ve added screen captures to the gallery.

Jun
12

Photos: Hulu’s FYC “Clips + Conversation” Event For Hulu’s “Pam & Tommy”

Sebastian attended Hulu’s FYC “Clips + Conversation” Event For Hulu’s “Pam & Tommy” today in LA. I’ve added photos of the event to the gallery. Enjoy.