Category: Interviews

Sep
03

Video: ‘The Falcon and the Winter Soldier’ cast teases what Sharon’s been up to, other plot hints

EW.com — The cast of forthcoming Disney+ series The Falcon and the Winter Soldier are shielding plot details pretty fiercely — but when they sat down in EW and PEOPLE’s video studio backstage at Disney’s D23 Expo, they did tease a few hints.

Aug
26

Video: Sebastian Stan & Anthony Mackie Talk ‘The Falcon and the Winter Soldier ‘ at the 2019 D23 Expo

This past weekend Sebastian stopped by the 2019 D23 Expo to promote his upcoming show The Falcon and the Winter Soldier on Disney’s new streaming platform Disney+ which debuts this November.

You can check out all the press interviews in the below YouTube playlist along with high quality screen captures.

Aug
23

Photos: 2019 D23 Expo

On August 23rd, Sebastian Stan and Anthony Mackie teamed up during the Disney+ Showcase at Disney’s D23 EXPO 2019 in Anaheim, California to discuss their upcoming series The Falcon and The Winter Soldier which will debut on their new platform next year.

The Falcon and The Winter Soldier will stream exclusively on Disney+, which launches November 12. 2019.

May
28

Sebastian Stan Reveals He Wants to Direct, His Favorite Marvel Memory With Chris Evans, Bucky’s Last Interaction with Captain America and More from MCM London Comic Con

My apologies if some of this seems disjointed. I cut and pieced many of this together from a handful of ComicBook.com’s articles to make one master post for easy reading. Much of what they reference is from the videos posted via YouTube.

Sebastian Stan Wants to Direct

Avengers star Sebastian Stan wants to turn director, but the actor admits he’s still “very far, far off” from heading behind the camera.

“It’s only in the last couple years that I’ve become so in awe of directors and the moviemaking aspect. As an actor, I used to only see myself and the scenes and my contribution, but then I realized, ‘Wait a minute, you’re part of this big thing,’”

“And there’s always a sense of vision and just the way that you can tell stories visually, with sound, the whole editing [aspect], the way you can influence [a film] — it just fascinates me. Yeah, it would be nice to kind of find something that could make sense at some point, but I’m still very far, far off from that.”

Asked if he might make his directorial debut on streaming service Disney+, where Stan and Captain America co-star Anthony Mackie will lead The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, Stan said with a laugh, “They’ll never, they’ll never let me. I don’t know about that. That’s a high bar.”

Sebastian Stan Reveals What Bucky Would Have Done With Time Stone in Avengers: Endgame

To say that the Winter Soldier has been some through some awful things in the Marvel Cinematic Universe would be something of an understatement. He went from being Steve Rogers’ best friend and an Army officer before being captured and experimented on by HYDRA and then, after falling to his presumed death, brainwashed into becoming the superpowered assassin Winter Soldier. It’s a complicated, bleak history, a history that fans might expect Bucky to want to undo if he had the chance. But, according to Sebastian Stan, there’s something else he’d do if Bucky got his hands on the Time Stone.

Stan was asked by a fan during his appearance at MCM London this weekend what Bucky would do if he had the opportunity to use the Time Stone — the Infinity Stone that has the ability to manipulate time — and it turns out, Bucky wouldn’t completely erase his history as Winter Soldier — just the assassinations.

“What would Bucky do if he got the Time Stone? Get the hell out of there!” Stan joked. “No, if he got the Time Stone of course he would go back to face himself in the ’70s and then it would have to be two Winter Soldiers, one against the other, then he would have to face himself and stop himself from creating about 864 assassinations.”

The idea that Bucky would use the stone to go back and prevent his other self from carrying out the multitudes of assassinations HYDRA and the KGB had him carry out over the years rather than stop himself from becoming the Winter Soldier in the first place is an interesting one. While it would in theory keep much of the character’s history intact, stopping some of the assassinations would likely have far-reaching impact on the MCU’s history on the whole. What’s certain is that a Winter Soldier on Winter Soldier fight would be pretty epic to see, much like watching Captain America fight himself in Avengers: Endgame was a pretty great scene itself.
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May
28

Video: Watch Sebastian’s Full Saturday & Sunday Panel’s from MCM London Comic Con

Sebastian Stan MCM London Full Panel Saturday

Sebastian Stan – MCM London Sunday panel

Jan
22

Sebastian Stops by AOL Build to Discuss ‘Destroyer’

Sebastian stopped by AOL Build Series in New York on January 21st to talk about his film Destroyer. You can check out high quality photos, screen captures and video of the interview below in case you missed it.


Jan
21

Sebastian Visits The Late Late Show with James Corden

Sebastian stopped by The Late Late Show with James Corden this past Wednesday to promote his latest film Destroyer which also stars Nicole Kidman. Also on the show was Sebastian’s Marvel co-star Cobie Smulders.

You can find high quality screen captures and stills from his appearance in the gallery now.


Jan
20

Sebastian Talks ‘Destroyer’ with ScreenRant

ScreenRant.com — We spoke with Stan about his role in Destroyer and how he plays an influential role in Erin’s past, while also threading into the emotional chaos of her present. He revealed what sort of one-on-one research he conducted with real-life undercover detectives to prepare for the role, what it was like working alongside Nicole Kidman, and even how his character differs from – but also relates to – Bucky Barnes in the MCU.

What sort of research is necessary to get into the mind of someone like Chris? Were there any real-life undercover stories that stood out before filming? Or did you prefer to rely more on Karyn’s direction and the script?

No, I always think before we start something is the most critical time, because you’ve got the time – that’s where you’re having the most time to prepare, and once you get to set, it really is about the director and what everybody else brings. But, at the beginning, just looking at the FBI and wondering how does one become an undercover cop? That was the main question. And what kind of background do those people have? What potentially leads someone to make that decision? There’s obviously an addictive quality to the thrill and adrenaline that a life like that entails, so then it says something about what kind of person are we talking about? And you should just keep dialing back, going back as far as you can to what drives a person… I had an FBI agent that I met with; that was very helpful. Kind of got me through the logistics. You know, where you want to go, what you apply for, the kind of training you get. Because there wasn’t a lot said about Chris in terms of his background – I mean, they have that little story in the beginning, but you don’t know how much of that is true and if they’re making it up. It kind of gave me freedom to make some choices. I just knew deep down that I was playing a guy who loses himself enough in his job for another person so much that he’s willing to throw it all right out the window. So, and then- you kind of make decisions from there. You’re kind of just a scavenger, just looking for everything you can find.

Yeah, it seems like everyone in Destroyer is kind of at odds with their identity in some way.

That’s what I loved about the script. I loved that everybody is sort of teetering on the edge of  being a good or a bad person, per se; or being thrown in situations where they have to make decisions that are not likable or- and that’s very human to me. That’s what I love about her [Kidman’s] character. We’re seeing a female character that… you know, meeting situations in life, and doing the best that she can, but is still the character that she is; the circumstances of one’s life, what shapes them to be what they are – and how much of that can you let go of or how much of that can you accept or not accept. The demons can grab any kind of person, no matter what they are or where they come from.

Now, if you don’t mind me touching on this a little bit, you obviously play another character who famously struggles with his identity. Bucky Barnes. Did you notice any overlap in how you would approach Bucky’s struggle with identity versus how you approached Chris’?

No.

Kind of just came at it from the same-

[Laughs] No, man. Of course not. Listen, I love Bucky Barnes. I really do. It’s just a very separate entity in a way. For me it is. And I certainly treat it that way. The characters, to me, are very different in terms of kind of the emotional baggage that they carry, per se, or what their emotional intelligence is. Now, you can make some parallels about identity, and a search for questions of identity; wanting to lose oneself or embrace certain aspects of yourself. Maybe that’s something the characters have in common. But, essentially, I was always thought it was a different situation.

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Jan
20

Sebastian Stan talks about working opposite Nicole Kidman in ‘Destroyer’ and playfully dodges some Marvel questions

BusinessInsider.com — Business Insider talked to Stan about that, the steps he took to get in the role for “Destroyer,” and “Avengers: Endgame.”

Jason Guerrasio: Were you as shocked to see how Nicole looks in the present day “Destroyer” footage as we were when that still of the movie came out?

Sebastian Stan: Yeah. I didn’t have any scenes where she transformed. I didn’t experience that firsthand. I only saw that photo once on the internet. It’s really impressive. You are always inspired by those things. And now that we are doing press it’s fascinating to listen to Nicole talk about her process and finding her way into the character. The whole thing to me is a science project. Not one choice wasn’t well thought out. Those are my favorite kind of roles, when you can see someone extremely recognizable and you lose them in the role.

Guerrasio: Well, how was your process for this? You also had to get into a certain mindset.

Stan: On a much smaller scale than her, but it was a little similar. The great thing about the script is it didn’t spell out who these people were. It didn’t tell you much about where they came from or what their lives were outside of the job. So it allowed me to build a whole backstory on my own based on what the guy was doing in the story. Figuring out what kind of guy would lose himself in this scenario.

Guerrasio: Does that include going back and watching old cop movies?

Stan: On something like this you get a good excuse to go back and revisit projects that are inspiring. And I also met with an FBI agent in New York who is a family friend and was able to go through the script with him. That was really helpful because I really wanted to understand what it takes to become an undercover agent and what sort of training you would need. A lot of these guys sometimes have military training, other times they have training on the street. That was one of the decisions I was making with my guy. Ultimately he’s somebody who is more at home while on the job rather than his real life. That’s how it appeared to me. So I kind of created this backstory that he had a bad history with the law when he was younger and then wanting more structure in his life decided to join this line of work using his experience from his past. [“Destroyer” director] Karyn [Kusama] suggested I shave my head and we talked about the tattoos and finding a look for the guy. That was exciting, too.

Guerrasio: How you all play off each other in this movie is one of the thrills. Do things get competitive on set between actors on a movie as intense as this? Will seeing an actor really bringing it across from you make you pick up your game?

Stan: It happens on set. It happens in a way that can be healthy for the movie, and it can also happen in a way that’s not healthy for the movie. We did not have that on this. And I think it’s because you have good actors. This cast, the work speaks for itself. But when it’s an intense scene some of us may keep our distance, but that’s a level of respect. You’re always coming from a level of honoring the other person and their process.

Guerrasio: This is the kind of story that’s not told in movie form anymore. These crime thrillers are more and more finding their way to TV. So how bad did you want this role because on the movie side it’s becoming more rare to do.

Stan: I wanted it very badly. I had done “I, Tonya,” and that was a great experience and I loved every minute of it. I wanted to find a collaborative effort similar to that. But I really thought I wasn’t going to find it. Then I found it with this. I wanted to be a part of it because I respected Karyn and Nicole and I just knew this was going to be a very specific movie.

Guerrasio: You’ve done some great supporting roles, are you gunning for lead actor parts?

Stan: Always. There were a couple of things that almost came my way that would have been great. The opportunity is there. I’m much more interested right now in working with a great director and on a great script and that’s been a priority for me. But I’m looking all the time. Down the line I want to be remembered for being a part of specific works and visions of directors rather than a group of characters. I’m still figuring that out.

Guerrasio: Have to throw out some Bucky questions before I go. (Note: This interview was conducted before the “Avengers: Endgame” trailer was released.) Have you wrapped all your stuff on “Avengers 4”?

Stan: I haven’t worked on anything since two years ago, so no. My character died in the last film. [laughs]

Guerrasio: Ok? How about this one: Are the reports true that you and Anthony Mackie are going to team up for a Winter Soldier/Falcon limited series on Disney+?

Stan: Anthony Mackie and I are going to try to revive “Beverly Hills Cop.” We’re trying to get Eddie Murphy, but he’s not calling us back. It’s been difficult, but hey, you have to keep trying, right?

Guerrasio: I’m getting nowhere with you, am I?

Stan: [laughs]

Jan
20

Sebastian Stan and Karyn Kusama on ‘Destroyer’ and the Method in Nicole Kidman’s Madness

ETOnline.com — “At some point, I’ve got to ask you about some of your guilty pleasures out there,” Sebastian Stan says off-hand to his Destroyer director, Karyn Kusama. “Because in my head, I feel like you’re watching, like, super f–king amazing horror projects…”

Though Kusama may be best known for her own horror films, including the “really disturbing in a great way” (as Stan put it) The Invitation and the campy Megan Fox cult classic Jennifer’s Body, her tastes are hardly confined to the genre; one of her early films was the Charlize Theron sci-fi spy action flick Æon Flux. “I don’t have guilty pleasures,” she shrugs. “I think Point Break is a masterpiece. I legitimately think it’s a masterpiece.” In fact, her latest film is most like the latter, a pulpy detective drama about LAPD officer Erin Bell (a bewigged Nicole Kidman), who goes undercover to investigate a gang of bank robbers with her partner, Chris (Stan).

(For his part, on the topic of guilty pleasures, Stan shared, “I was working out today and because of this thing with a Boston accent that I’ve been looking up, I ended up watching the Housewives of Boston and I was like, Oh, my God, this is so insane!“) (I pointed out there is no Real Housewives of Boston.)

With Destroyer opening in select theaters on Christmas Day, Kusama and Stan sat down with ET to discuss leaving their comfort zones, what it took to make Kidman look like a meth addict and how hot Stan looks covered in tattoos.

ET: Karyn, you’ve worked in so many different genres — you did sci-fi early on and then moved into horror and television. This feels like something new. What was it about this story that called out to you?

Karyn Kusama: A couple of things. Practically, I was excited to make a movie in L.A., which is my home and I have a family here and I collaborate with my husband, who was one of the writers of the script. I have a dog! [Laughs.] I felt like it was a nice way to be committing to working in my hometown — which a lot of that TV that you mentioned doesn’t allow me to do. I was [also] really drawn to this labyrinthine journey that this very compelling character makes, where we discover her capacity for love, her capacity to make huge mistakes that haunt her for the rest of her life and her capacity to take some responsibility for those mistakes. In today’s times, that’s an interesting thing to watch a person decide to do.

What put this guy [Stan] on your radar?

Sebastian Stan:Our agents.

KK: Our agents, but also, you have a lot of nice friends.

SS: Oh, good!

KK: No, but you do. You have a lot of nice friends that I think are nice people and good actors, so when your name came up, I’d be like, “Oh, that’s cool.” And then I watched I, Tonya, and I felt like, that’s so interesting to see a guy who in real life, frankly, has a leading man vibe and leading man looks — in a great way, not holding it against you. You’re a very handsome dude — but to see you play a character who was capable of so much smallness and shame and ugliness, I just thought, “My God, that takes bravery.” After our first Skype session, I was like, let’s just figure out how we’re going to work together.

Had you read the script by then?

SS: I had read the script and then we had a Skype session about it. I just love that it felt like you were never really figuring out entirely what was happening or who these people were. It didn’t explain anything, it just kind of–

KK: Put you in their lives.

SS: Yeah, and you’re there as a witness and it’s as if you’re walking by and you’re turning and you’re seeing that scene happen. That felt very real to me. I always feel like, as an actor, you’re always looking in the writing for rhythms, and those scenes were written a certain way. It’s a very direct, frank nature that they have with each other, at least in the scenes that I was involved with Nicole. And I was like, here’s an opportunity to play a completely different character by not doing anything. By almost just letting–

KK: By not indicating anything about the character. By just being, they told so much story.

SS: Exactly. And I just knew it was going to be a very special movie. The idea of protagonist and antagonist was always flipped around here, and I think that in life, good people do bad things and bad people sometimes end up doing a good thing for that moment, or whatever. This movie was so straightforward about that. And to have a female character that had no excuse for anything in a way that didn’t apologize but also, you understood where she was coming from, because all the flaws were so… Nobody shied away from any of that. And then you get Nicole to do it and then you’re like, “All right, well, now it’s going to be a whole other thing!” [Laughs.] Continue reading